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Tiffany Singh

Tiffany Singh Contemporary Artist.

sayapatri

SAYAPATRI 100 LAYERS LALITPUR NP 2014

monsoon

MONSOON PAINTINGS LALITPUR NP 2014

lalitha

LALITHA LALITPUR NP 2014

FLY ME UP TO WHERE YOU ARE

WELLINGTON INTERNATIONAL ARTS FESTIVALWELLINGTON 2013/4

dust

PATAKA SHRINEWELLINGTON NZ 2014

dust

WE ARE BUT DUST & SHADOWAUCKLAND NZ 2014

dust

THE BLOOM OF TIME SUITEAUCKLAND NZ 2014

BRICK BAY 2014

BRICK BAY SUMMER ARTIST SNELLS BEACH NZ 2014

CALLING A CIRCLE HE KARANGA PAE

CALLING A CIRCLE PAREHUIA NZ 2013/4

LET THE PURE WIND RELEASE YOU

LET THE PURE WIND RELEASE YOU SYDNEY AU 2013

WHAT IS THE COLOUR OF THE BREEZE

WHAT IS THE COLOUR OF THE BREEZE TARANAKI NZ 2013

FLY ME UP TO WHERE YOU ARE

CHRISTCHURCH ARTS FESTIVAL CHRISTCHURCH NZ 2013

RATIONALISATION

RATIONALISATION RESISTANCEALBUQUERQUE USA 2013

LIVING WALL

LIVING WALL CALIFORNIA USA 2013

BELLS OF MINDFULNESS

BELLS OF MINDFULNESS MONTALVO USA 2013

MUSTARD

A MUSTARD FIELD OF THE MINDAUCKLAND/WELLINGTON NZ 2013

FLY ME UP TO WHERE YOU ARE

AUCKLAND ARTS FESTIVAL AUCKLAND NZ 2013

WHITE

WHITE NIGHT PHOTO ESSAYAUCKLAND NZ 2013

MAY THE RAINBOW ALWAYS TOUCH YOUR SHOULDER

MAY THE RAINBOW ALWAYS TOUCH YOUR SHOULDER AUCKLAND NZ 2012/3

VEIL

THROUGH THE VEIL I GENTLY HEAR YOU CALLAUCKLAND NZ 2012

Artdego

ARTDEGO ARTWEEK NZ 2012

splore

SEVEN HUES OF HARMONYAUCKLAND NZ 2012

IMAGINATION IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN KNOWLEDGE

IMAGINATION IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN KNOWLEDGE BANGALORE IND 2012

ALL OUR RELATIONS

ALL OUR RELATIONS SYDNEY BIENNALE AU 2012

The Drums Between The Bells

DRUMS BETWEEN THE BELLS MELBOURNE AU 2012

The Spaces In between

SKY ABOVE EARTH BELOW Waikato NZ 2011

petals

PETALS & PREMAUCKLAND NZ 2011/2

Knock On The Sky Listen To The Sound

KNOCK ON THE SKY LISTEN TO THE SOUND WELLINGTON NZ 2011

PRE(SERVE)

PRE(SERVE) HASTINGS NZ 2011

Wihaan

WIHAAN STRELIZIA GRANDUS Auckland NZ 2011

Einstein & His Eastern Piece

EINSTEIN & HIS EASTERN PIECE TAICHUNG TW 2011

Peace garden

A TOKEN OF FRIENDSHIP PEACE GARDEN APIA WS 2011

Einstein was a buddhist

EINSTEIN WAS A BUDDHIST TARANAKI NZ 2011

Newton & the piece bomb

NEWTON & THE PIECE BOMB AUCKLAND NZ 2010

Union

CONVERSATIONS AUCKLAND NZ 2010

Union

UNION AUCKLAND NZ 2010

Group

GROUP SHOWS NZ

WELCOME TO THE ARCHIVE OF ARTIST TIFFANY SINGH

This site contains the complete retrospective of Social Practice Projects, Exhibitions & Biennials from 2010 to present day.

Because of the changing nature of ephemeral artwork the artist has chosen to document process & engagement, alongside studio based experiments & geographical location to make an unfolding arts practice, transparant & accessable. Often the objects exhibited in the gallery, institutional & non-site spaces are the results of the co-authorship between artist, audience & fair trade artisan. These non-tangiable processes become the work of art as the focus on our relationships, community wellbeing & organic healing is then partnered with social practice methods, fair trade materials with sound & colour vibration to encourage engagement to facilitate collaborations & sustainable support systems.

For details of latest work & upcoming shows please visit  Tiffany Singh Current

 

SAYAPATRI 100 LAYERSlalitpur nepal 2014


THUS SHALL YE THINK OF ALL THIS FLEETING WORLD; A STAR AT DAWN, A BUBBLE IN THE STREAM, A FLASH OF LIGHTNING IN A SUMMER CLOUD, A FLICKERING LAMP, A PHANTOM & A DREAM : SIDDHARTHA ART GALLERY / bells, hand-cut ribbons, rice, monsoon water, milk, beeswax, peacock feathers, marigolds, paper, social practice

Sayapatri -100 Layers is a work that focuses on the life-giving force of Mother Earth / Papatuanuku, rendered in a 2 month process to honour the monsoon season in Nepal (2014). The artwork is constructed of local Nepalese materials associated to ceremony & ritual, collected daily with monsoon rain. The evolution & physical growth of the artwork through both artist & audience participation hopes to emulate the energy associated to the life cycle of the healing, cleansing abundance of the monsoons fertility.   

These every day materials resound as an artwork through prayer, meditation & repetition, with the intention of creating an artwork, rich in the tradition of daily practice. To reference ceremony & ritual, deeply embedded in the Indic tradition along with the many other wisdom traditions.

Through the repetition of the Medicine Buddha Mantras falling words the collected monsoon rains paired with sacred materials, the artwork becomes impregnated with aura of healing and purification. In this way, the process of making the artwork, mirrors the process of mantra meditation were the artistic practice & spiritual practice become one in the making of the installation.

The title Sayapatri -100 Layers  alludes to the mythologies, symbolism & spiritual significance each material brings to the reading of the art work. These multiple readings & extensive lineages endeavour to transcend religious restraints & cultural expectations connecting to a base understanding & enlightenment of the human condition. Sayapatri -100 Layers  is an attempt to unite us all in the respect & humility we all must have for the sacred &
re-generative forces of Mother Earth / Papatuanuku. 

As water represents the 'non-manifested substratum from which all manifestations derive' & is considered by Hindus to be a purifier, life-giver & destroyer of evil - Dr. Uma Mysorekar, Hindu Temple Society of North America

KATHMANDU CONTEMPORARY ARTS RESIDENCY
Established in 2010 as Nepal’s first international contemporary arts centre, KCAC facilitates dialogue & exchange opportunities for Nepali and international artists. They promote the development of high quality artworks & experimentation within a diverse range of media, helping develop new ways of thinking beyond the religious, economic, ethnic & political divisions in Nepal. It helps foster links between artists and the local community & creates a platform for critical discourse & interaction between artists from Nepal and the rest of the world.

The work created on this residency was funded by the Asia New Zealand Foundation for the Art In The Asian Century Exhibition, celebrating the foundations 20th anniversary.

 

 

 

 

MONSOON PAINTINGSlalitpur nepal 2014


THUS SHALL YE THINK OF ALL THIS FLEETING WORLD; A STAR AT DAWN, A BUBBLE IN THE STREAM, A FLASH OF LIGHTNING IN A SUMMER CLOUD, A FLICKERING LAMP, A PHANTOM & A DREAM : SIDDHARTHA ART GALLERY /  Watercolour, monsoon water, paper, pen

The work consists of locally picked seasonal flowers crushed to extract natural dyes overlaid with watercolour to mirror the colour way of Sayapatri -100 Layers. The prayer flag reference repeats in a set of five colours, representing the elements & the Five Pure Lights. These different elements are associated with different colours for specific traditions, purposes & Sadhana. According to traditional Tibetan belief, health & harmony are produced through the balance of the five elements.The paintings are then offered to the the monsoon water allowing the rains to inform the aesthetics of the final work.

The monsoon paintings used flowers picked from Kirtipur which were given to the artist while she was planting rice in the area. The flowers also resonate 
the sentiment of the exhibition - the fleeting moment or the “glimpse.” These flowers were in bloom at one time and their colour and form has now been immortalised in paper left out in the monsoon rain. There is much vibrancy in the pigments, extracted through the Japanese ‘hapazome’ technique as the paintings are revealed; real flowers & watercolour paint mixed with monsoon rainwater, finally details observed by the artist were added on to the paintings with gold pen.

KATHMANDU CONTEMPORARY ARTS RESIDENCY
Established in 2010 as Nepal’s first international contemporary arts centre, KCAC facilitates dialogue & exchange opportunities for Nepali & international artists. They promote the development of high quality artworks & experimentation within a diverse range of media, helping develop new ways of thinking beyond the religious, economic, ethnic & political divisions in Nepal. It helps foster links between artists & the local community & creates a platform for critical discourse & interaction between artists from Nepal & the rest of the world.

 

 

 

RATIONALISATION RESISTANCEalbuquerque USA 2013


RATIONALISATION RESISTANCE : SPIRIT ABUSE /  film, mixed media & social practice

For Rationalization Resistance, Singh’s work -- which includes video with sound, mixed-media installation and social collaboration -- addresses the problematic construct of Rationalization. Rationalization Resistance is an examination of ritual, in both constructive and deconstructive states, that alludes to a rich area of human self-expression.

A shifting of rationalization towards a ritual space, that primarily relates to human emotions, which support an individual and collective experience through action and contemplation, is repeatedly energized with thought and intention and therefore gains strength.

“As the modern world honors the dynamic chief of rationalization, we enter into a bureaucratic organization not limited to capitalist production, in a society infused with a bureaucratic, rationalized system,” states the artist. “Inside of which, actions are systematic and order justified by recourse to legalistic rules, rather than personal or traditional ties. Learned knowledge over remembered knowledge. Institution before intuition,” states the artist. “It is our most meaningful actions that approach a sense of ritual, as audience becomes artist; energy is projected in intention in action. A gesturing takes place with a certain subconscious and purposefulness which renders their actions into a kind of ritual,” 

New Zealand based installation artist Tiffany Singh’s first solo exhibition in the United States. The open reception will take place on July 12 at 5PM at Spirit Abuse, the project space of the interdisciplinary artist collective Postcommodity located at 1103 4th St, NW, Downtown Albuquerque, NM (4th and Mountain). Rationalization Resistance will be on view 11AM-5PM, Wed-Sat. July 22 through August 24 by appointment. This exhibition is presented in partnership with the IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts in Santa Fe, NM.

 

 

 

 

LALITHAlalitpur nepal 2014


THUS SHALL YE THINK OF ALL THIS FLEETING WORLD; A STAR AT DAWN, A BUBBLE IN THE STREAM, A FLASH OF LIGHTNING IN A SUMMER CLOUD, A FLICKERING LAMP, A PHANTOM & A DREAM : SIDDHARTHA ART GALLERY / sindoor, earth, incense, diya, water, flowers, paper, beeswax

Lalitha is conceptually linked to Sayapatri -100 Layers as both works focus on the shakti energy of the goddess, in this work Lalitha focuses on the life-giving force of the Red Goddess. Lalitha means “She Who Plays”. All creation, manifestation & dissolution. The title itself is a play on words, as the artist appears to play with the vibration of materials by simply creating a field of red vermillion in the space in order to pay homage to Lalitha Tripurasundari, the Red Goddess.  Again the artwork brings to light the materials of ceremony & ritual as the entire space becomes a site specific installation aesthetically referencing ‘puja’. In particular materials associated to Lalitha Tripurasundari; scent (earth), incense (air), flame (fire), water & flowers (aether) tinged with red, in their basic forms to represent the five impressions. The complete blanketing of the space is a conceptual rendering of maintenance as an intermediate state between the two polarities. When she, is worshipped as “creatrix” (Lalitha) the order is from the centre to the perimeter, as “dissolver” (Kali) the puja is conducted from the perimeter to the centre.

Dear One, Tripura is the ultimate, primordial Shakti, the light of manifestation. She, the pile of letters of the alphabet, gave birth to the three worlds. At dissolution, She is the abode of all tattvas, still remaining Herself - Vamakeshvaratantra

KATHMANDU CONTEMPORARY ARTS RESIDENCY
Established in 2010 as Nepal’s first international contemporary arts centre, KCAC facilitates dialogue and exchange opportunities for Nepali & international artists. They promote the development of high quality artworks & experimentation within a diverse range of media, helping develop new ways of thinking beyond the religious, economic, ethnic & political divisions in Nepal. It helps foster links between artists & the local community and creates a platform for critical discourse & interaction between artists from Nepal & the rest of the world.

At the conclusion of the residency & exhibition the artist filmed a performance in this work honouring Lalitha & Kali. This will be seeded into new work.

 

 

 

FLY ME UP TO WHERE YOU ARE WELLINGTON nz 2014

NEW ZEALAND INTERNATIONAL ARTS FESTIVAL SOCIAL PRACTICE PROJECT ENGAGING 3000 STUDENTS IN DECILE 1 & 2 SCHOOLS IN THE AUCKLAND REGION : AOTEA SQUARE / cotton, bunting, paint, social practice

Fly Me Up To Where You Are is relevant to the personal,  political and social position of a city, reflected in the aspirations of the community’s youth. providing a platform for the voice of the community to be seen and heard as a collective. An importance is placed on the role of creativity to process concerns, hopes, dreams and ideas. These concepts when addressed in a positive and considered way, allow for the community to be responsible and connected, not only to each other but also to the aspirations of our younger generations, by identifying what can be achieved through notions of co-authorship.

This artwork facilitates a space for learning, sharing and connecting to the world around us, to ignite an enthusiasm and responsibility in our younger generations for the wellbeing of the community and world we wish to create. This is a project thats is located on the periphery of community service, social work and fine art, a project that gives rise to a conscious development around how we address our own backyard issues. It stimulates awareness around social and political concerns to encourage us to take ownership over the direction of education and the communities we want to live in.

An iconic event on New Zealand's cultural landscape and a leading multi-arts festival in Australasia - the Festival has been taking place in February-March on every even-numbered year since 1986. We celebrate the world's top international artists as well as nurturing and presenting work from some of the best artists and producers in New Zealand. We forge creative collaborations that excite us and strive to provide extraordinary experiences for our audiences.
The 2012 New Zealand Festival was enjoyed by over 275,000 people from across New Zealand, with over 30% travelling in from outside the city to enjoy the Festival in Wellington.  The 2014 Festival, featuring 1220 artists and writers from 18 different countries, took place from 21 February - 16 March.

 

 

 

 

WE ARE BUT DUST & SHADOW AUCKLAND NZ 2014

MELANIE ROGER GALLERY / nature prints & ceramic installation with organic beeswax cabin

Three very different artists - Tessa Laird, Richard Orjis and Tiffany Singh - weave their practices together in an attempt to find beauty in imperfection and profundity in nature. These works are made from a desire to embrace natural cycles, accepting growth, decay and death. Each artist has presented a new series of work, as well as working on a collaboration, "Three Distinct Parts of the Shadow". Laird's prints have been offered up for sacrifice, as Singh and Orjis have added their own layers of history, creating an exquisite surface of cicatrices.

Singh's 'The Bloom Of Time' consists of a suite of Nature Paintings. Extracted and distilled from organic dyes the paintings are soaked & splattered with the halos and stains of floral pigment and natural plant dyes. Blooms growing through cracks in concrete have been immortalised through the ancient Japanese practice of Hapi Zome. These works are born through natures gift of time and are a snapshot of a summer in Raumati 2014.

Orjis & Singh’s ‘The Night Walked Down The Sky With The Moon In Her Hand’ Moon jar installation articulates the two halves on imperfection. Vessels to talk with the ancestors. Bearing fruits and containing presence, imbued with a romantic sense of simplicity.

'Dreams Of Other Worlds' is a new collaborative work by Orjis and Singh speaking of serenity and escape, focused on the pleasure of making. The mindfulness of repetition is echoed in a collaboration with nature and the culture of the bees. As the work positions itself to reflect the words of D.K Suzuki from the book Into The light Of Things, "To be satisfied with a little hut, a room of two or three tatami mats, like the log cabin of Thoreau”.

Like a branch representing the entire tree, shoji screens filtering the sun, or the moon almost completely obscured by a ribbon of cloud, "Dust and Shadow" is an investigation of beauty that is both personal and collective, quietly contemplative and alive.

 

 

 

THE BLOOM OF TIME AUCKLAND NZ 2014

MELANIE ROGER GALLERY / gold & silver pen, gold leaf, beeswax, silver & gold ink hapi zome summer flowers

Distilled with natural dyes of ; indigo, coprosma, marigold, tanekaha, blackberry, raurekau, eucalyptus, cochineal, rosemary & rose to extract & render the artists colour spectrum of Red, Magenta, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue & Violet. These natural dyes have then been layered with experiments in hapa-zome. An ancient Japenese technique that transfers the natural pigment of flowers taught to the artist by natural dye sensai Deb Donnelly. 'The Bloom Of Time' suite consists of A3,A4 & A5 paper nature paintings. Extracted and distilled from organic dyes born through natures gift of time become a snapshot of a summer in Raumati 2014. The paintings are then soaked & splattered with the halos and stains of floral pigment & natural plant dyes.  Then embossed with forged wild blooms once growing through cracks in concrete immortalised by the ancient Japanese practice of Hapi Zome. After the paintings have been fully coloured they are then overlayed with the symbolic moth of death to offer a discourse of reincarnation and regeneration. 
 

 

 

 

A TREE WHICH MOVES  SOME TO TEARS OF JOY IS IN THE EYES OF OTHERS ONLY A GREEN THING THAT STANDS IN THE WAYSNELLS BEACH NZ 2014

BRICK BAY SUMMER ARTIST RESIDENCY : BRICK BAY SCULPTURE TRAIL / wood, hemp, fair trade bells

Singh’s The Tree Which Moves Some To Tears Of Joy Is In The Eyes Of Others Only A Green Thing That Stands In The Way draws on the ancient tradition of tree worship (dendrolatry) which has played an important part in many of the world’s mythologies and religions. Singh considers this work as an offering to the forest spirits in the hope they will hear our call to keep the kauri safe in the face of the devastating kauri dieback disease that is affecting areas of forest across Auckland and Northland. Kauri dieback disease is caused by a microscopic soil-born pathogen and Singh hopes visitors to the work will be encouraged to learn and carry out the hygiene necessary to halt the spread of. In April 2009, Tāne Mahuta, the largest remaining kauri, thought to be well over 1200 years old, was symbolically partnered with Jomon Sugi on Yakushima island, Japan, one of the oldest Japanese cedar trees, thought to be over 2000 years old. Singh’s new work references this connection by using the form of Torii gates. These iconic gates are significant structures, placed at the entrance to shrines, forming the division between our world and the spirit world. At Brick Bay a series of these gates will lead people along the wooden boardwalk through the kauri grove to the main kauri, which Singh view as living shrines. Visitors passing through the gates will be able to play the suspended bells, which become softer and of higher tone as visitors progress along the walk.

The pathway, and the gates of The Tree Which Moves Some To Tears Of Joy Is In The Eyes Of Others Only A Green Thing That Stands In The Way, culminate close to to Phil Dadson’s Listen-stop, a prosthetic performance task for solo, contemplative listening and/or conversation with the birds, the bells and the kauri.

BRICK BAY SUMMER ARTIST RESIDENCY

A compelling outdoor gallery experience, where an ever-changing exhibition of around 45 sculptures by leading New Zealand artists are sensitively sited along the 2km trail.  Supporting the Brick Bay Sculpture Trail, the Brick Bay Sculpture Trust has been established as a charitable trust, with revenue made available to assist selected artists in meeting the considerable expense of building outdoor work. The Brick Bay Sculpture Trust philosophy is to make a significant contribution to New Zealand art by providing an exceptional setting for outdoor sculpture to be experienced and sold, while also offering the facilitation of public and private sculpture commissions, offering a summer residency and commission for a NZ artist each summer.

 

 

 

CALLING A CIRCLE He  Karanaga PaeAUCKLAND NZ 2013/14

COLIN MCCAHON ARTIST RESIDENCY : PAREHUIA THE MCCAHON HOUSE RESIDENCY / mixed media, fair trade bells & social practice

Calling A Circle: He Karanga Pae by McCahon House Artist in Residence Tiffany Singh is about the concept of wellbeing in relation to the process of grief, death and dying. Leading researcher in the field of Positive Psychology, Mihaly Csikszentmihaly emphasizes the importance of creativity in stimulating wellbeing, arguing that flow, the creative moment when a person is completely immersed in an activity that is engaging and challenging for its own sake, is a natural anti-depressant. 

On Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays individuals were invited to come to the studio to share a quiet and sacred space and to make a string of bells, flowers and other trinkets with messages to loved ones who are no longer with them. Every Friday the strings were blessed on site and then taken to Colin McCahons studio, trnsforming this into a temple space for mediation and preparation to pass over. Robert George will be working with performance artist Lucy Mary Mulholland to create a  moving image piece that responds to this work whilst honouring the sacrifices on Anne McCahon.

At the end of the three months the strings will be collected and blessed in a ceremony at which they will be burnt and the ashes collected. A showing of the documentary will form the basis of a further event and the ashes will be gifted to the McCahon House Trust along with the documentary as a permanent and protected record of the project.

McCahon House Artists’ Residency, is amongst the most prestigious artists’ residencies in New Zealand. Three residencies a year, each of three months duration, are available to outstanding mid career artists. Artists receiving the residency live and work in the purpose built French Bay house with attached studio.

 

 

 

LET THE PURE WIND RELEASE YOUSydney AU 2013

LUCKY : CARRIAGE WORKS / brass, copper, clay, twine, beeswax, paper, flowers, leaves, natural dyes.

This work is a collaboration between myself, Kanji Devji Maheshwari, Luhar Janmamad, Sale Mohammed & Indika fair trade organization. As these works are an attempt to keep the ancient tradition of Kharki (bell making) alive.
www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/history/ghcc/eac/oralhistoryp...
Here the edition of the natural materials reinforces our connection and relationship to nature. The paper cranes and the bells also hold an energy that speaks of freedom and peace and are accompanied by a beautiful sound whenever the bell chimes. This sound and icons are reminders of how Lucky we are to be present and alive in the world at this time. It is a hope the the colours of the chakras the sound of the bells and the peace of the cranes remind the owner of the bells the joys of simplicity and the good fortune that surrounds us always. These works look at the interconnectedness of life by using a Western contemporary framework to support an ancient Eastern tradition. By being able to work in a global way in todays world and connect precious objects with people, being able to artwork as a bridge between these worlds is something the artist considers Lucky.

In 2013 Carriageworks presents Here & Now a series of three projects curated by Liane Rossler. Here & Now offers new commissions and limited editions by works only avialable at Carriageworks. The spirit of Here & Now is artist driven and experimental. Each of the projects are organised around one concept and will be shown in a custom made space.

 

 

 

what is the colour of the breeze?TARANAKI NZ 2013

TARANAKI INTERNATIONAL ARTS FESTIVAL : GOVETT-BREWSTER CONTEMPORARY ARTS MUSEUM / bamboo windchimes, mixed media, ribbons, social practice

This artwork saw an education team working in 19 schools across the New Plymouth district. The education team with the artist lead workshops on colour in nature and colour in different cultures. The students were then gifted a windchime to paint in a colour they chose. This generated a 1001 bamboo windchime rainbow for the festival. The individual works created in the school were then hung together in a non-site in the heart of the city, forming a symbol of diversity to bring people together. The artwork could not exist without the social practice involvement in both making and viewing the installation. The process of engaging the children in the community enabled them to take ownsership of generating a community based artwork. Their exploration of colour & meaningful symbols contributed to a large scale outdoor interactive scultpure which creating a soundbased artwork for wider community to enjoy.

This artwork engaged 1001 New Plymouth Children with an audience over 10,000 during the festival enjoying and playing the chimes.

 

 

 

 

fly me up to where you areCHRISTCHURCH NZ 2013

CHRISTCHURCH ARTS FESTIVAL SOCIAL PRACTICE PROJECT ENGAGING 4500 STUDENTS AFFECTED BY THE EARTHQUAKE IN CHRISTCHURCH : COUNCIL BUILDING WORCHESTOR BOULEVARD CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT / cotton, bunting, paint, social practice

Fly Me Up To Where You Are is relevant to the personal, political and social position of a city, reflected in the aspirations of the community’s youth. providing a platform for the voice of the community to be seen and heard as a collective. An importance is placed on the role of creativity to process concerns, hopes, dreams and ideas. These concepts when addressed in a positive and considered way, allow for the community to be responsible and connected, not only to each other but also to the aspirations of our younger generations, by identifying what can be achieved through notions of co-authorship. Facilitating a space for learning, sharing and connecting to the world around us, to ignite an enthusiasm and responsibility in our younger generations for the wellbeing of the community and world we wish to create. This is a project thats is located on the periphery of community service, social work and fine art, a project that gives rise to a conscious development around how we address our own backyard issues. It stimulates awareness around social and political concerns to encourage us to take ownership over the direction of education and the communities we want to live in.

 

 

 

LIVING WALL CALIFORNIA USA 2013

COME HEALING : MONTALVO ARTS CENTRE STUDIO / collected organic matter from the residency grounds, paper, water colour

Inspired by the nature study movement which was a popular education movement in America in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Nature study attempted to reconcile scientific investigation with spiritual, personal experiences gained from interaction with the natural world. The walls then become nature studies and spaces for philosophical thoughts to rest. This device has became quite seminal in Singh's work directly informed Calling A Circle’s; I Have Died Many Times Our Breath Makes Me Alive Again 2014. The nature study walls are a way to learn and observe surroundings on residencies. It requires the artist to gather locally, observing quietly, local moses, stone and organic forms of life to delicately examine the growth & spirit of things. The wall then becomes an additive space of research and reflection that starts to have a discourse with locality and the current project enquiries.

LUCAS ARTS RESIDENCY FELLOWSHIP

This was the wall project that accompanied the social practice artwork Bells Of Mindfulness whilst on the Lucas Residency at Montalvo Arts Centre. The Sally and Don Lucas Artists Residency Program (LAP) is designed to offer artists from a range of disciplines an environment conducive to individual and collaborative creative practice. Seeking to stimulate an energetic exchange of ideas between culturally diverse Fellows and across varied artistic fields and scholarly disciplines, the residency has earned international recognition as a model of curatorial practice supporting the development of new and challenging contemporary work. 

Located amidst a 175-acre natural landscape, Montalvo was built by the late Senator James D. Phelan in 1912. Upon his death in 1930, the Senator gifted his beloved Montalvo to the San Francisco Art Association to be maintained “as a public park [with] the buildings and grounds immediately surrounding... to be used as far as possible for the development of art, literature, music, and architecture by promising students.” After assuming trusteeship, the Art Association announced their intent to launch an artist residency at Montalvo, the third program of its kind in the United States. In 1939, Montalvo’s residency opened with five artist studios and a small gallery in the historic Villa. At the official opening, Dr. Stephen Pepper, head of the art department at the University of California, Berkeley stated, “Through the cooperation of artists and the community, Montalvo in its silence and beauty, will become one of the creative forces of the world.”

 

 

 

BELLS OF MINDFULNESS Montalvo USA 2013

COME HEALING : ITALINATE GARDEN PERSIMMON TREE / fair trade bells, twine, natural dyes, paper

Bells Of Mindfulness draws on the buddhist tradition of bells to remind us to exist in the present moment. By creating a participatory work that focuses on wellbeing through sound, play and activation. In activating the bells as a catalyst for a sensual experience to aid an internal shift & return to self, focusing on the breath, smiling whilst pausing for a moment in time to experience the simple beauty of the artwork. 

The artwork doubles as an experiment with what ‘happens’ when people are invited to engage with an open-ended concept. The project consists of a number of stages, the first of which is a large-scale, outdoor installation made up of compositions using chakra coloured strings and bells suspended from the tree. This initial installation functions as at catalyst for the main body of the work, which comprises the process of audience interaction and engagement. For the last stage of the installation, the audience will be invited to a ceremony where they are asked to take one of the strings of bells away and reinstall the bell in their sacred place initiating the ‘mapping’ of sacred places through social media and photo sharing. Through this a map of the bells will be generated for future audiences to experience the works subtle reincarnations of the moving and shifting bells as the work becomes a living entity.

Meditation, mediation and repetition in the form of the multiple have become signifiers of Singh's practice related to the notion of the whole represented in parts, which corresponds to our responsibility as a collective entity and our individual roles within that construct. The cranes were left exposed to the elements, slowly dissolving and becoming tattered as the wish is released. In this way they are related to the prayer flags of India and Tibet and echo to the cyclical notion of the bells being installed, deinstalled and reinstalled in their different incarnations.

The Come Healing exhibition is presented as part of Flourish: Artists Explore Wellbeing, a multi-disciplinary programming initiative organized by the Lucas Artists Residency Program in collaboration with Montalvo’s Education Department. Through exhibitions, conversations, performances, and workshops join us as we explore the questions: how can we live meaningful, happy and healthy lives? How can we flourish? With The Bells of Mindfulness, Tiffany Singh (Auckland, New Zealand) proposes to deeply examine the idea of sacred spaces. Drawing on the Buddhist tradition of using temple bells as an aid for mindfulness, she has suspended 1000 handmade fair trade metal bells and 1000 paper cranes attached to brightly colored ribbons from a persimmons tree in Montalvo’s Italianate Garden, creating a tranquil space for rest and reflection. Sourcing the bells from rural artisans in western India, Singh hopes The Bells of Mindfulness will inspire conversations about the importance of better equity in international trade.

The Bells of Mindfulness is a participatory sculpture. 
Please feel free to share the journey of your bell with us on Facebook.com/montalvoarts and on Twitter or Instagram @montalvoarts.
you can follow the journey of the bells here;

bellsofmindfulness1.tumblr.com/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A MUSTARD FIELD OF THE MIND Auckland/Wellington NZ 2013

MELANIE ROGER GALLERY / BARTLEY & COMPANY ART / beeswax, pigment, wooden shelves, social practice

The pungent phrase - a mustard field of the mind - from British novelist Hari Kunzru via Kiwi artist/writer Tessa Laird opens up the multiple possibilities inherent in Tiffany Singh's art practice. What Laird has described as the &quot;constant engagement with the aesthetics of elsewhere&quot; in Singh's work enables viewers to journey with all senses to a territory outside the usual ambit of contemporary New Zealand art. Singh has carved out her own distinctive niche to create a installation based practice which embodies her heritage (Punjabi, Samoan, Maori and Pakeha) and her belief in the transformative power of art – both in its ability to engage people in creative conversations and acts and for its capacity to provoke reflections on such non-mainstream issues as the nature of the sacred. For Singh herself, the sacred is about samsara – the repeating cycle of life, death and rebirth. This is played out literally and metaphorically in her work with concepts and materials repeated, recycled, refreshed and reformatted across installations and exhibitions.

Etymology and origin Saṃsāra means “he flows into himself,” to perpetually wander, to pass through states of existence. Saṃsāra or Sangsāra  (in Tibetan called ‘khor ba (pronounced kɔrwɔ  in many Tibetan dialects) literally meaning “continuous flow”, is the repeating cycle of birth, life, death and rebirth (reincarnation) within Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Bon, Jainism and Yoga. In Sikhism this concept is slightly different and looks at our actions in the present and consequences in the present. These concepts will inform this body work that looks at the aesthetic spaces in between each casting.

The works become domestic temples referencing the Eastern domestic shrines it is the artists intention that the works become alive and are added to with flowers incense & offerings of the audiences own choosing. 

 

 

 

FLY ME UP TO WHERE YOU ARE AUCKLAND nz 2012-2013

AUCKLAND ARTS FESTIVAL SOCIAL PRACTICE PROJECT ENGAGING 6000 STUDENTS IN DECILE 1 & 2 SCHOOLS IN THE AUCKLAND REGION : AOTEA SQUARE / cotton, bunting, paint, social practice

Fly Me Up To Where You Are is relevant to the personal,  political and social position of a city, reflected in the aspirations of the community’s youth. providing a platform for the voice of the community to be seen and heard as a collective. An importance is placed on the role of creativity to process concerns, hopes, dreams and ideas. These concepts when addressed in a positive and considered way, allow for the community to be responsible and connected, not only to each other but also to the aspirations of our younger generations, by identifying what can be achieved through notions of co-authorship.

This artwork facilitates a space for learning, sharing and connecting to the world around us, to ignite an enthusiasm and responsibility in our younger generations for the wellbeing of the community and world we wish to create. This is a project thats is located on the periphery of community service, social work and fine art, a project that gives rise to a conscious development around how we address our own backyard issues. It stimulates awareness around social and political concerns to encourage us to take ownership over the direction of education and the communities we want to live in.

The Auckland Arts Festival is Auckland's premier festival of New Zealand and international arts. The globally-recognised event celebrates people and culture, and showcases the cultural diversity and vibrant energy of New Zealand's largest city. Since the inaugural event in 2003, the Auckland Arts Festival has welcomed over a million attendees. Held in March over 19 days, the sixth biennial Festival in 2013 shattered attendance records, successfully engaging new, larger and more diverse audiences. It offered irreplaceable experiences for both audiences and artists, and reached more than 180,000 people.

 

 

 

 

WHITE NIGHT PHOTO ESSAY AUCKLAND NZ 2013

AUCKLAND ARTS FESTIVAL : VARIOUS LOCATIONS ACROSS AUCKLAND CITY / mixed media & social practice

White Night is a collaboration between different institutions and the Auckland Arts Festival. White Night 2013 saw five of Singh's artworks around Auckland. In collaboration with Jamie-Mae Lees Photography the works were shot in sequence showcasing works from the Auckland Arts Festival, The Auckland Art Gallery, Conversations Of Mind, The Auckand Council Microsites initiative & Art In The Dark. The photo essay also showcases the social practice component of Fly Me Up To Where You Are & audience engagement with the artworks being exhibited.

Shot over six locations in one night, the photo essay features Lees speciality; nightime photography. These images combine Lee's signature attention to detail & sensitivity to colourful composition creating a photo essay that is alive with both the engagement & interaction of the audience responses. Visually rendering the artist's creativity over the one city in one night.

Auckland Arts Festival’s brilliant night of nights White Night is back again after a hugely successful inaugural event in 2011. On Saturday 16 March, over 60 of Auckland’s galleries, museums and arts spaces will be open between 6pm and midnight.  Art projects and performances will spill into public spaces, with free buses scheduled to help people squeeze in as much activity as possible. Galleries and arts spaces right across Auckland - from Devonport to Pakuranga, Western Springs to Mangere as well as the central city and arts-rich surrounding suburbs - will stay open long after the sun goes down. First-time gallery-goers and arts connoisseurs alike will have the opportunity to experience a rich variety of curated exhibitions and installations, live music, artist talks, new media and interactive works, and specially-programmed performances. Auckland Arts Festival Artistic Director, Carla van Zon says, “White Night is a unique opportunity for people to experience art in a new light, and explore a city brought to life by art. It’s a time when doors are opened, barriers are broken down, and art is available to everyone" The monumentally successful Art in the Dark lights up selected White Night venues with creative projects from some of New Zealand’s most innovative artists, including Tiffany Singh’s mesmerising wind chimes at the Auckland Museum.

 

 

 

MAY THE RAINBOW ALWAYS TOUCH YOUR SHOULDER Auckland NZ 2012/3

AUCKLAND ART GALLERY : THE LEARNING CENTRE / mixed media & film

May The Rainbow Always Touch Your Shoulder was a space to explore and celebrate colour and its various cultural, spiritual and environmental associations. 

THE DIRECTION OF SUNBEAMS / ribbon, paper, social practice

Tiffany Singh has worked with communities in India making art projects since 2005. These provide empowering experiences for individuals and have also introduced a collaborative aspect to her art making, enabling her audience to participate, create and share. In 2012 she travelled to Bangalore to work with HIV + children who created the first of these ‘rainbow’ works by creating their magic place. The children folded their narrative drawings into boats, which were symbols of their hopes and imaginary journeys that were central to the installation. The Direction of Sunbeams will be in place for one-year and boats of different colours, made by visitors, will be added until the work is complete. 

DUSTED WITH SPICES OF A MILLION FLOWERS  / ceramic, cast beeswax forms, flowers, spices, bees, feathers, healing foods, paper & offerings

The sequence of colours used here is not the spectrum that we are most familiar with, but relates to Singh’s study of Eastern practice of colour and healing. Here, the six energy centres, or chakras, of the human body are the source. Each of these have physical and spiritual qualities that respond to sound frequencies which resonate to the wave-lengths of these colours. The six columns of stacked ceramic boxes have been dipped in coloured beeswax and each contain wax casts of objects which have been gifted to the artist with the understanding of the sacred role they play. Natural processes and materials are central to Tiffany Singh’s art making. She encouragers us to be more aware of the beauty of these everyday materials and the way they sustain natural life.

PORTRAIT OF A FRIEND / HD film
This filmpiece by Robert George unpacks the making of Dusted With Spices Of A Million Flowers

THE AUCKLAND ART GALLERY LEARNING CENTRE

The learning centre at the Auckland Art Gallery explores how works of art come into being - how artists observe and explain the world that we know and imagine. Each year, a New Zealand artist is commissioned to create a new year-long installation for Auckland Art Gallery's Creative Learning Centre. Commissioned artists have included Reuben Paterson (2011/12), Tiffany Singh (2012/13), and Sean Kerr (2013/14).

 

 

 

 

THROUGH THE VEIL I GENTLY HEAR YOU CALL Auckland NZ 2012

ART IN THE DARK : WESTERN PARK / ribbons fair trade wind chimes & social practice

Through The Veil I Gently Hear You Call alludes to the metaphysical realm of understanding in-between the physical & spiritual world.  Densely filled branches with ribbons & chimes sound out near the bottom of the park as a beautifully suspended sound based installation becomes a low-fi musical instrument. Veil like forms created ethereal partitions,  curtain like waves that the audience can slip between activating the sound or simply engage in the sensuality of feeling the work brush against them. The audience moving through the work became a part of the process, activating the work along with the wind currents so that the artwork became alive and able to be ‘played’. This sound based work is subtle in its approach creating intervention space within the park. The works subtlety plays on the gentle calling of the chimes leading people to the analogue discovery of the of work itself and then the joy of being an active ingredient in collaboration with it.

Over four nights annually, Art in the Dark lights up Western Park in Auckland with creative projects from the most innovative artists in New Zealand and abroad. Participating in Art in the Dark challenges artists to create projects that not only fit the specific contours of the great, urban outdoors but that must illuminate the dark, using sustainable materials and energy wherever possible. Last year this free event saw Auckland’s Western Park transform into a buzzing hub of activity with over 50,000 visitors. This audience witnessed over forty light art installations ranging from projections, performances, installations and large scale immersive experiences.

 

 

 

 

ARTDEGO Artweek NZ 2012

AUCKLAND ART WEEK : THE NATHAN CLUB / lithographs, wax & social practice

Five chefs have each chosen one artist to work with on their dish. Each dish will be presented in a way you may not expect. These creative partnerships will blur the line between art and food. Course one belongs to Nick Honeyman, head chef of the Commons, in collaboration with artist Johl Dwyer. Course two will be created by Stephen Smith, head chef at Tin Soldier, in collaboration with installation artist Tiffany Singh. Course three is the work of Mark Southon, head chef at the Food Store, in collaboration with artist Liam Gerrard. Before your main is served, you’ll be treated to a performance by poet Courtney Sina Meredith. Her recent collaboration with Beatnik Publishing has resulted in the publication of her first beautiful collection of poetry called Brown Girls in Bright Red Lipstick. Course four belongs to Hayden McMillan, head chef at TriBeCa in collaboration with artist Elliot Collins. Course five, dessert, is being brought to life by chef Brian Campbell, head chef at the new Britomart dessert restaurant that’s set to open this summer. He is collaborating with artist Alexander Bartleet.

ARTWEEK Auckland is a visual arts festival building on the foundations of expertise provided by galleries, both public and private across Auckland.  Arts professionals collectively curate and facilitate events and installations to create a dynamic and exciting "week" showcasing our amazing visual arts community.With activations taking place in eight different precincts, including Auckland’s Heart of the City, Newmarket, Ponsonby, Arch Hill / Uptown, Parnell, Karangahape Road and Devonport, there are also satellite events in the South, West and North Shore. 

 

 

 

 

SEVEN HUES OF HARMONYAUCKLAND NZ 2012

SPLORE : TAPAPAKANGA REGIONAL PARK / saris, temples, lanterns, paper, holi powder, social practice

In the ancient scriptures the worship of trees is associated to ancient Eastern practice. The Ancient Aryans worshiped nature, and plants, trees and the elements were always revered with several rituals connected to them. This practice continues to be an element of modern Eastern traditions with individual trees, usually distinguished by species, position or appearance that were used as an object for wishes and offerings. Such trees are identified as possessing a special religious or spiritual value. By tradition, believers make offerings in order to gain from that nature spirit the fulfilment of a wish.

Drawing upon these histories Seven Hues of Harmony takes a pohutukawa tree located at a sacred site and brings it to life by turning the tree into a outdoor mediation, meditation temple space for the audience to enjoy. The audience can then decorate the collection of stupas - a Tibetan form called a Chorten which represents the basis of offering. It is a symbol of enlightened mind, (the awakened mind, universal divinity) and the path to its realisation. These Spiritual Monuments will be available to the participants to decorate and leave with the tree temple so that the sacred space continues to grow.

Situated in a Beguiling Bay on the shores of Tapapakanga Regional Park, the three-day Splore festival introduces fresh energy and a new dimension to the ancient homeland of the tangata whenua Ngāti Whanaunga and Ngāti Pāoa.

At the conclusion of the festival the messages were collected and made into a book that was gifted as an offering to the Splore creators.

 

 

 

 

IMAGINATION IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN KNOWLEDGE BANGALORE INDIA 2012

#1 SHANTHI ROAD RESIDENCY : COLLABORATION WITH NEG SCHOOL, URBAN SLUM SCHOOL IN COX TOWN FUNDED BY SAVA SACHIN / paper, neel, rose, milk, copper, rangoli power, kumakum, marigold, diya, cotton, tumeric, lentil, social practice

This work looks closely at the narrative of storytelling and traveling as a shared common experience. This work in collaboration with Jagruthi draws out the imagination of standard I II and III years focusing on the imaginary places they dream to go to. In teaching students to see themselves as storytellers, and by fostering a classroom culture in which all stories are valuable connections to the human experience, we, as a community of learners, unite ourselves in an ancient tradition, and in the telling of our stories, thereby pass the gift on to others. Creating an aural & visual language of our thoughts and personal experiences provides the opportunity to share them with others. Therefore, the telling of our stories becomes powerful in its ability to convey the experience to others, in its ability to connect us to the human experience, while simultaneously having the ability to teach us about ourselves, or dreams and our own inner connections.

The objective with these children is to provide or rather facilitate a space for imagination is relation to processing their current emotive and physical states of well being. As creative output generates an awareness or position of allowing the subconscious to flow in terms of releasing feelings and emotions that otherwise have limited outlet. This is a space without judgement or criticism where imagination can run wild and thoughts, ideas, fears and experiences can be shared and manifested in real ways. Hopefully providing a space of healing and sharing for these personal imaginary landscapes and dreamings.

ASIA NEW ZEALAND FOUNDATION RESIDENCY

The residency programme provides an opportunity to interact, experiment and work with local materials & agencies. Bangalore offers diverse inspirations as a cosmopolitan and eclectic city. The artists of the city have straddled diverse genres and are part of the divergent contemporary landscape. The challenges of the residency programme encourages artists to move beyond the comfort of studio spaces and work in new circumstances. This residency is open to artists working in all media, with a priority on artists who propose a project that engages with the local community and/or those working articularly those working with local handicrafts.

 

 

 

KNOCK ON THE SKY LISTEN TO THE SOUND SYDNEY BIENNALE 2012

ALL OUR RELATIONS : BUILDING 61 COCKATOO ISLAND, PIER 2&3 SYDNEY BIENNALE SITES / bamboo windchimes, ribbons, mixed media, social practice

Knock on the Sky Listen To The Sound is a work that focuses on participation via audience engagement and artistic contribution. It is a work that relates to the role of healing, spirit and an ephemeral experience of the work. The notion of the pilgrimage is embedded in a journey from one site to another, inviting the audience into entering a wide-open field of knowledge production and exchange with priorities in practice, relevance, context & consciousness, with a shared common sense and experience.

The static install located at Cockatoo Island saw 800 wind chimes suspended in a geometric colour spectrum pattern utilise the architecture of the open air structure to reference the chakras a vedic concept believed to be a number of wheel-like vortices which, according to traditional Eastern medicine exist in the surface of the subtle body of living beings. The aural sensitivities functioned as the karakia for the chimes installed at pier 2/3, ensuring the safe journey back to the island of the 1000 chimes once decorated bythe audience by evoking spiritual guidance and protection. The Pier 2/3 wind chimes were suspended from the ceiling by ribbons echoing the same colourway as the Cockatoo Island. This installation then shifted in state; from static to mobile, from private to public as the audience choose decorated and reinstalled their chime embarking on a pilgrimage back to the island.

The work attempts to hold elements of the scared at every interval of its conception and realisation. Encouraging the audience to imbue their own energy into the work, bringing their own belief systems and historic reference to pilgrimage. The concept of this socially engaged work aligns itself to the curatorial aspect of the Biennale by focusing on the connections between site, audience, and spirit. By reiterating the sentiments of the18th Biennale of Sydney which will be rooted in storytelling as it is currently being re-imagined as a coming-into-being in relation. In the reciprocity that is storytelling, both teller and listener inhabit the space of the story. Telling stories connects us and allows us to care, to be; it fosters collaboration; it aggregates knowledge and generates new ideas; it ignites change; and, ultimately, builds community.

THE 18TH SYDNEY BIENNALE

The 18th Biennale of Sydney focuses on inclusionary practices of generative thinking, such as collaboration, conversation and compassion, in the face of coercion and destruction. With the creation of conditions for an encounter in consonance with our surrounding world, this event brings emphasis to what is already happening at large. Drawing on the possibility of the present, the Biennale emerges from the engagement of all participants by using a model that begins with two curators in dialogue. This matrix of conversation extends to both artists and audiences in a multi-vocal correspondence.

all our relations relies on these various exchanges, affinities and empathies as its dynamic structure, the vascular and cellular structure and sinew of a kind of living, breathing organism, from which the Biennale’s meanings grow. Artists work in a context that allows for mutual recognition and audiences from differing backgrounds are part of this continual development, finding their own direction in these connections. It is in this altered attention to one another, in the meeting and making of ideas together, that constructive consequence can follow.

In seeking conjunctive energies, this collaboration has taken place on many different levels: in co-existence, conversation and juxtaposition but also in purposeful connectivity. Within this framework of mutuality, recognition and thoughtfulness, disparate ideas – some distantly and some closely related – are brought together in an exhibition process of composition; much akin to the process of thought itself. Artists, who can often feel isolated in their practice, come together with neighbouring artists. Rather than one work appearing to link to one or two other works, an attunement between all creative impulses takes place in time. Projects correspond as if evolving from each other and progress through the sequence of venues and buildings. This interconnection and interdependency occurs in the knowledge that audiences will take elements from the exhibition and connect them with their own experiences. In this shared space, the meaning and consequence of the artists’ works is engendered.

First published on the occasion of the 18th Biennale of Sydney (2012) in the exhibition catalogue titled ‘all our relations’ edited by Catherine de Zegher and Gerald McMaster. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DRUMS BETWEEN THE BELLS MELBOURNE AU 2012

NEXT WAVE FESTIVAL : THE CITY ELM TREE /  fair trade bells, ribbons, social practice

Drums Between The Bells  alludes to the metaphysical realm of understanding in-between the physical and spiritual world.  It seems an appropriate title for this work as the artwork transforms a living space into an open-air musical instrument.  The outdoor is densely filled with strings of small bells hanging vertically from the branches as a beautifully suspended installation; so the audience moving through the work would activate it along with the wind currents so that the work became alive and able to be ‘played’. This initial installation then became available for participation.  The audience was be asked to take a one of the bells on a pilgrimage to their favourite place and install the bell there, it would also be requested that they document this process online creating a new work that would be dispersed throughout the city, the photos and film footage would be uploaded into the next wave website with a map of the city so that the work could continue to live on at different locations creating a treasure hunt of bells moving and mapping the communities favourite or sacred parts of the city.

By generating this pilgrimage of bells the work would then take on a life of its own as the bells would be able to be found via the website and again be relocated to a new site by via public engagement, generating a non static work that has the capacity to live on via its physical and cyber space revivals.

Next Wave strives to cultivate enthusiasm for art, artists and a changed world. We believe in the energising force of a new context, environment or idea as key to transformation. We seek change within the professional practice of individuals, as a pathway to the development of society. We see collaboration as necessary resistance, a mirror and the primary source of the critical rigour we strive to instil in all emerging artists and arts workers. We believe in risk as the crucial ingredient in every artistic endeavour, and with clarity of intent we think anything is possible. We support what is attempted over what is achieved. Multiple, radical perspectives are celebrated; complexity is embraced. We maintain a focus on the edges of society as the place from which the new must emerge. Curiosity is our guiding force, and it leads us in a relentless pursuit to ask the question “who’s not here?”

 

 

 

THE SPACES IN BETWEENWaikato NZ 2011

SKY ABOVE EARTH BELOW : WAITAKARURU ARBORETUM / windchimes & trees

The Spaces In Between focuses on balancing an environmental setting by using the sound-based nature of the work to resonate and reverberate around the lake and through the trees. In hearing the works tones a meditational space in created throughout the walk which stimulates the senses & relaxes the mind. The chimes were painted in the signature colour spectrum of the artist Red, Magenta, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, Violet which reiterates the sound and colour vibration sequence in the Eastern philosophy of the chakras.

The 2010 ‘Summer’ exhibition was curated by highly-regarded curator Andrew Clifford and is sub-titled ‘Sky above, earth below’ to reflect the exhibition’s relationship to its site and the world around. The Waitakaruru Arboretum site is the ideal setting for sculpture exhibitions. The 17.5 ha (42 acre) hillside site provides panoramic vistas over the fertile Waikato valley and contains intimate tree-enclosed spaces and interesting landforms.

Clifford says that “producing public art is usually the exclusive domain of senior practitioners and is a difficult area for emerging artists to gain experience. So I’m hoping to introduce to the Sculpture Park a selection of younger artists who may not have had opportunities to work outdoors before.”
Clifford’s vision is to “clearly contextualise the works in relation to Waitakaruru’s extraordinary surroundings, in a relatively open landscape with wide horizons, a situation that is rare in the much tighter confines of city spaces and galleries where art is usually found.”

 

 

 

PETALS & PREMAUCKLAND NZ 2012

AUCKLAND COUNCIL PLACEMAKING SCHEMES : VARIOUS LOCATIONS IN AUCKLAND / flowers, music & social practice

In the spirit of love, Tiffany Singh and a selection of musicians are generously sharing a blend of Eastern and western tradition on valentines day. Located in the heart of the city we intend to spread out  persian rugs and cushions and create an area for appreciating music and feeling cared and loved in. Balamohan Shingade is a classically trained bhujin singer who will give a performance of traditional hindi love songs that speak of Krishna and Radhas epic & historical love story. During this enlightened rendition of love, that draws on sharing culture  traditional music in the hope to enliven, educate & inspire Auckland city. Tiffany Singh will draw upon a western tradition of valentines day and hand out flowers to those who are a part of amalgamation of this eastern and western cultural experience.

Art and artists are a significant part of the creativity and dynamism of the Auckland region; and public art is a key way to engage artists’ creativity and ideas in developing Auckland’s contemporary public realm. Auckland Council has a strong interest in supporting public art activity in all its forms because it contributes to Auckland becoming the world’s most liveable city. Art works range from the traditional to the highly inventive, from the intimately scaled to the landmark. These are, and will be, created by artists from both near and far, and evoke Auckland’s highest aspirations, New Zealand’s stories and diverse cultural landscape. Auckland’s vision is stated in the Auckland Plan: As the world’s most liveable city Auckland will be a place that Aucklanders are proud of, they want to stay or return to, and others want to visit, move to, or invest in.Public art is a local public service that enhances the attractiveness, interest and design quality of public places in Auckland’s network of towns, villages, neighbourhoods and open spaces. 

 

 

 

 

KNOCK ON THE SKY LISTEN TO THE SOUNDWELLINGTON NZ 2011

CRYSTAL CITY : THE DOWSE & ENJOY ARTIST RUN SPACE / fair trade windchimes, paint, tree, bamboo, rice, candles, sage, ribbon & social practice

The initial Enjoy installation would see the gallery as a silent suspension over a white rice ground. In the hope that these cleansing components activate sacred space as the installation prepares to become available for participation. Triggered through participation is a process of multi faceted deconstruction and reconstruction via sensations of sight, sound and experience. Creating sound as the physical experience of exchange activates the chimes. The work at this point transforms from one cohesive large-scale work to a series of multiples, gifted as single parts. With the work changing constantly as the gallery becomes silent again as all the chimes are reinstalled at the tree at the Dowse after being decorated by the audience. linking artist run spaces with Museum spaces within the community. Re-examining the division between ritual space and productive space.  As means to initiate inquiry into ways which cities understand their boundaries in relation in commercial and sacred space. The work aims to emphasise the interconnection of sacred and political realms, and carry forward the understanding of polis not just as a collection of buildings, inscriptions, governmental procedures, or historical events but also as lived experience.  To offer the initial work of art as a gift. Alludes to an anthropological, economical, psychological, and utopian ideal of object and service, material and non. Where the ‘giving’ and the outer gift can become a vehicle of culture. This methodology can be applied to examining our current immersion in the market economy whilst attempting to create an alternate economy, as we collectively engage in social arts practice.

The physical work reflects the aforementioned criticality as it sets forward a motion a social intervention achieved by the community.  Creating a work that is beyond duality, encompassing a greater whole.  As inclusion of process makes the work evolutionary in a literal sense, the audience becomes the maker shaping the works form and ultimate result. As the term Botanical Dichotomy suggests a mode of branching by constant forking, as in some stems, in veins of leaves, essentially a form of growth. The overall artwork is an attempt to harness the energy of potential, whilst leading to a more cohesive, involved and invested community. 

Works by seven contemporary Asian artists, some living in New Zealand, others based internationally, will be on show at The Dowse this winter . The exhibition deals with travel and exploration, invoking a sense of uncovering the wilderness within urban environments and bringing together the organic with the manufactured. Curator Emma Bugden says Crystal City demonstrates The Dowse’s commitment to bringing art from elsewhere to showcase alongside the work of local artists

 

 

 

 

 

 

PRE(SERVE)  Hastings NZ 2011

MULTIPLY: REINVIGORATING REPETITION : HASTINGS CITY ART GALLERY / beeswax, pigment, wooden shelves, social practice

This social practice art work used the device of multiple wax forms to create a rainbow spectrum. After a period of time that enabled the rainbow to be seen as one, the forms became available for individual exchange. Following the opening event, the wax sculptures where available for barter, whereby audience members could choose one wax figure in exchange for a jar of food, homemade preserve, or pre-loved toy which replaced the waxwork in the installation for the remainder of the exhibition. At the conclusion all the jars and toys were collected & gifted as a donation to the local food bank the community centre & the Hawke’s Bay Regional Hospital for the Auckland version all food, seeds & seedlings went to the local school where we provided breakfasts for the children with the ceramics & toys donated to the local hospice shop.

These processes aim to speak of sustainability, environmental conscious & community wellbeing that aid in creating a work of art grounded in an economy of gifting. Subverting commercial systems of exchange through public engagement that shift from static to fluid as participation grows. These evolutions of giving and receiving then open a cyclical process that encourage an exchange of community spirit through the experience of art to provide sustainability & community support on real & practical levels.  Alongside the exhibition free classes were held, in which the public could learn how to make homemade toys. This is an effort to promote a particular food consciousness, and to educate people to save money and eat well with easily grown and available local produce that they can share within their own communities.

Among those invited are established artists Elizabeth Thomson, Wayne Youle, Brett Graham, Rohan Weallans, alongside emerging stars Gregory Bennett, Ngaahina Hohaia and Tiffany Singh. Judith’s extensive network has also secured international artists Ottomar Hörl and Finn Magee. These artists are representative of many who are re-visiting the multiple due to its association with innovative industrial or digital technologies, and subsequent notions of excess or sustainability. Others employ the collective power of object and process to convey rigorous political and cultural narratives – resonant in our current capitalist crisis. Judith comments that her selection of these artists is due to them, “engaging in a reproductive art practice that reinvigorates repetition.”

 

 

 

WIHAAN STRELIZIA GRANDUS Auckland NZ 2011

MICROSITES AUCKLAND COUNCIL INITIATIVE : ALBERT PARK / wood, paint, mixed media & social practice

Wihaan Strelizia Grandus the Spirit House reflects primarily upon animism, a belief system with which the entire world lived by at one time or another. She aims to unite beliefs through action and participation aligned to the ancient Asian tradition of spirit worship in order to activate a common space of respect and acknowledgment between Eastern and Western tradition. The work also provides a space for other organisations to use whether it be through the arts, religious, or anthropological endeavour the site could double as an exhibition, ceremonial or contemplation space alongside being an active public sculpture we hope to show how we can generate more tolerance between cultures and be witness to the connections and the truths that unite us.

Micro Sites is a series of 12 small, temporary public art projects by 13 artists that are intriguing, subtle and surprising discoveries for people living, working and walking through Auckland’s Learning Quarter. The Learning Quarter encompasses Albert Park, The University of Auckland, AUT University and surrounding streets and neighbourhoods. The Micro Sites project was conceived as an opportunity for artists to create small-scale interventions that run against the grain or interfere with everyday perceptions and experiences of a place or neighbourhood.
 
Micro Sites is a public art initiative of Auckland City Council developed in partnership with The University of Auckland and AUT University.

The 3 year process of Wihaan also engaged the artistic community by nominating an artist for each 6 month colour change. Loosly providing the the ancient Hindu chakras, which are fundamental in Eastern healing and spiritual practice as inspiration for each colour. The chakras follow the same system of colour as the rainbow spectrum.

THE ARTISTS ARE
Red; Tiffany Singh
Orange; Tessa Laird
Yellow; Rachel Walters
Green; Anna Boyd
Blue; Raewyn Turner
Purple; Peter Madden
 

 

 

 

EINSTEIN & HIS EASTERN PIECE Taichung TW 2011

MEDI(T)ATION : NATIONAL TAIWAN MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS. / paper, salt, chinese herbal medicine & social practice

Responding to ideas of polarisation v’s balanced consciousness, social and spiritual meditation (and mediation) alongside the shifting and repositioning of modern life a meditative work made from natural and healing materials has emerged. Examining the colour spectrum of Chinese medicine in the form of a ceremonial & festival like space, that is activated through the audiences response to the work. This in turn generates an artwork to address our health and wellness alongside our contemporary state of being as the pressures of modern day society shift our relationships to nature & each other. 

The artwork in a constant state of flux, is enabled or realised by public participation. It begins as an initial installation that is static which then moves through a process started by an opening ceremony. This then hands the artwork over to the public as the participants then complete the artwork through an experiencial & communal releasing. This allows for acceptance, dialogue & joy around the concept & sensuality of wellness. It is an opportunity through fine art to address our inner and outer spaces that are often in conflict with each other by actually connecting to the work and releasing it in ways that speak of ceremony and ritual from multiple cultures. Activating both the participant and also the site the work inhabits. The artwork is a hope that by combining cultural materials associated to festival, ceremony & holistic medicine the processes of the artwork will then enable audience engagement leveraging a healing space that is created as a greater sense of understanding and respect is generated via the spiritual overtones of the work.

The 2011 Asian Art Biennial proposes the theme Medi(t)ation, a concept that reflects the trend across Asia towards an M-shaped societal structure and the related threats it poses, while presenting a strongly communicative Asian cultural stance and stressing methods for mediating conflicts and tensions. This biennial features 40 artists and collaboration groups from 21 Asian regions, including Taiwan, Japan, Korea, China, Hong Kong, Russia, Vienna, Indonesia, Philippines, Cambodia, Singapore, Malaysia, India, Australia, New Zealand, and artists from Central and West Asia as Iran, USA/Iraq, Kazakhstan, Turkey, Israel, and Pakistan. Presenting works in form of installation, painting, video, sculpture, onsite projects, performance, and interactive workshop to enrich the perspectives of Asian Art.

Medi(t)ation is a neologism coined especially for this exhibition. This new term combines the two core concepts of mediation and meditation, stressing mediation of conflict while also standing for the longing for reconciliation inherent in the human spirit. By coining the term “M-shaped society,” renowned Japanese economist and trends expert Kenichi Ohmae placed his finger on the changes to the social and economic structure we are currently undergoing. Medi(t)ation refers to exploring changing Asian culture, and how artists search for a middle ground between traditional values and modern cultural development amidst widely varying extreme influences; and how they look for the room for “cultural mediation” over the course of reflection and shifting power structures, to establish their position in the anxious area of global cultural competition.

 

 

 

EINSTEIN WAS A BUDDHIST Taranaki NZ 2011

STEALING THE SENSES : GOVETT BREWSTER ART GALLERY/ mixed media & social practice

Einstein Was A Buddhist draws on the Eastern practice of daily offering and mirrors cultural antiquity through recreation of the shrine. This act of offering is intended to focus on practice required to keep the shrine/altar replenished with flowers and other offerings which is considered a beneficial activity to focus one’s mind in the spiritual practices. The artwork progresses over the course of the exhibition, starting off static it is then is opened in ceremony by Whareoke & the artist in a water blessing stone pilgrimage. After this the work is activated through audience engagement as the participants are invited to choose one of the colourful chakra boats intuitively feeling what natural materials  ‘feel right’ they are then invited to journey along a  on a rice path  to the hanging shrine where they make they offering to one of the deities there.

The works evolution through social engagement is paramount as the work lives through the colourful offerings and presence of the collective interaction. At the end of the exhibition the artworks will be gifted to the Govett Brewster staff & Parihaka Marae.

Stealing the Senses at the Govett-Brewster Art Gallery shows work by international and Aotearoa New Zealand artists whose practices offer immersive sensory encounters. Collectively the artists propose new phenomenological experiences that highlight the socio-politics of the senses.Including several newly commissioned projects, these works will form a passage of immersive environments through the Govett-Brewster’s various architectural spaces. Creating their own temporal and spatial encounters, artworks have the capacity to create spaces that at once mirror and expose the illusion of reality. Invoking a term of Michel Foucault’s, as art works incorporate difference within themselves and become spaces of otherness, they can be thought of as heterotopias of the senses.The works address thematic concerns and issues spanning from the psychology of incarceration to mythologies, from the sensual usefulness of domestic-scaled functional objects to integrated systems of artificial life.

Govett-Brewster Art Gallery Director and curator of the exhibition Rhana Devenport says, “What is shared in these works is a concern for activation or interaction with the artworks through human sensory perception. An exploration of the impact of immersive experience is offered primarily through perception, tactile or analogue encounter rather than virtual means”. “Through stealing our senses for a dedicated time, in a dedicated space, artists corral our attention to multivalent ideas about the forces and sensibilities of contemporary living,” she says.

 

 

 

NEWTON & THE PIECE BOMB AUCKLAND NZ 2010

KNOWING YOU , KNOWING ME: ARTSPACE / paper, salt, mixed media & social practice

This work speaks of mediation; through terms of being a cultural bridge through its materiality and response to the idea of scared space, meditation and mediation for engagement to occur. By combining cultural materials associated to festival, ceremony and ritual, the work will then enabling audience engagement to generate a mutating evolving work of art rich with spiritual overtones.

The artist examined this process by inviting the audience to release the contents of my work (pigments, spices, dried flowers, food stuffs healing materials suspended in origami vessels). By entering and altering the work, the division between artist and audience dissolved and the work became a much more invested collaboration both physically and emotionally, where a sense of equality and community was established for its makers. 

Milan Mrkusich referred to the mystical’ or transcendent, stating the aims instead are to intuitively arrive at archetypal forms that speak of an underlying truth, using forms that alluded to harmonious mental states.  “Western alchemy offers us two concomitant themes: the transmutation of base metals into gold, which is regarded as the ultimate stage in a process of perfection".

Knowing You, Knowing Me brings together artists who work across two specific mediums; performance and drawing. At first glance these mediums might seem an unlikely combination, but within Knowing You, Knowing Me they are connected through an emphasis on small and personal gestures. The works in this exhibition span a range of concerns and ideas but each demonstrate an interest in a subjective connection. There is a handmade quality to much of the work, and a strongly defined sense of the self.

 

 

 

 

UNION AUCKLAND NZ 2010

UNION / MIC TOI REREHIKO / mixed media & social practice

WHAT COLOUR IS THE SACRED?
What Colour Is The Sacred? responds to Michael Taussig’s interest in magic and surrealism, and his statement that “Colors illuminate the backdrop of myths, and force the object to release hidden meanings, meanings that are neither complete nor lasting, to be sure, but that can gesture, ever so obliquely, to truths that remain otherwise concealed”.

The audience was asked to participate in creating a new artwork through the medium of exchange in the form of an offering, experience, story, or service for one of the wax works on the floor. In addition, the artist requests that the audience detail which sculpture and colour they chose and why on one of the postcards provided, to document the exchange. At the conclusion of the exhibition the exchanges will be photographed, and the postcards turned into a book.

What Colour Is The Sacred? draws heavily on the language of alchemy and transformation. The interactive component is grounded in the notion of philosophical anthropology, the interconnectedness of belief systems, and the concept of value. Through an interest in religious tradition and what these traditions can offer to the strengthening of communities here, What Colour Is The Sacred? hopes to explore individual, social and cultural attitudes. It forms a case study in which interaction, through the practice of bartering, becomes a part of social memory, means of story telling and a vehicle for information sharing. The work is an attempt to transcend a purely economic realm through meaning, a concept first suggested by socialists Marcel Mauss and Max Weber. The exploration of these ideas is based around barter in relation to globalising factors, with political relevance to treaties such as the Free Trade Agreement.

SEVEN SCENT
In many practices the energies contained within the natural world are called upon to manifest change through a process of magic. Although magic is perceived to be many things, the artist’s understanding of it is the involvement of subtle natural energies that manifest change. These practices, whilst traditionally offered in sacrifice to gods and goddesses, influence and affect the participants in many ways. These prophetic scents and colours are tools to obtain a clear state of consciousness, and heighten the participants’ awareness and spiritual involvements in many rites of passage.
 
This specialised form of ancient art manifests through vibration and visualisation, in collaboration with the subtle energy bodies that surround us. The bio-electrical energy is coupled with the vibration of scent and colour and is then developed by the participant’s intent. Through our sense of smell this aroma charged energy creates an internal change that activates both our psychic and conscious mind. The fragrance helps to calm the central nervous system, reconnect us to the present and help reinforce our inherent awareness.

HAVE DINNER WITH ME 
Food has always been an important cultural and social factor. As part of the closing ceremonies to my exhibitions dinner is offer as a chance to see the final evolution of the work, converses and exchange ideas and obtain relics of the shows. As dinner is a time where the gift of food can be passed on with added weight and added meaning. The creation of food is very similar to the creation of culture. We live in a time where the importance of food security, expanding sustainable agriculture practices as well as social and environmental aspects are stressed. Have Dinner With Me is an invitation to actively participate in politically engaged conversations around food and food autonomy, as well as providing opportunity to swap seeds, recipes and enjoy an organic culinary experience.
 
This concept of service and integration of social responsibility into the process of creating art appears to be most successful when combined with a dependence on community participation. Community participation equals community feedback equals a semblance of community ownership and then without the community there is no product, no vegetables, no empowerment, no shared knowledge, and no art. 

“Thus generosity became the medium, or methodology, and the subject, or product, of the project” - Mary-Jane Jacob.

 

 

 

GROUP SHOWS VARIOUS Locations

SACRED EXCHANGE; shown art Artweek 2008 as a part of Elam on the streets exhibition.

BEES DO HAVE A SMALL; Shown at First Thursdays, a community conscious arts event that acts as a platform for emerging and established artists alike to showcase their practice.

DONT MISS ALL THE BEAUTIFUL COLOURS IN THE RAINBOW LOOKING FOR THE POT OF GOLD; Shown at Conversations Of Mind, a multidimensional exhibition exploring the senses and inviting thoughtful contemplation of the nature of mind. 

CHINESE HOROSCOPE SHOW; Never Follow A Straight Line refers to a the stereotypical characteristic of a Chinese Horse Horoscope.

A SEAGULS AFTERNOON; is a soundscape translation of the poem, fused together with elements each of us wanted to put forward that we saw fit as representing the world and tone of my poem 'A Seagull's Afternoon.' A collaborative fusion of sound, space, sand and shadows - Rina Patel

 

 

 

 

A TOKEN OF FRIENDSHIP PEACE GARDEN APIA SAMOA

UNIVERSITY OF SAMOA  / CREATIVE NEW ZEALAND SAMOA RESIDENCY / social practice project

The Peace Garden project was conceived by working with the University of Samoa &amp; Coral Reef Academy. The Samoa's nationalist movement, the Mau, Women's International League For Peace & Freedom had previously created a garden in 1995 but over the past six years this had been turned into a rubbish dump. The artist choose to rejuvenate this site to honour the historical role of the Women’s International league. The artist aimed to, in collaboration with the three agencies, develop a site specific space to help restore energy & healing whilst promoting personal & environmental transformation by turning the rubbish site into a peace garden through the powers of collaboration & social practice methodologies. Involving the four departments of the University of Samoa, Horticulture, Textiles, Music &amp; Performing Arts &amp; the Coral Reef Academy to create an inclusive living artwork featuring the indigenous medicine plants of Samoa to grow a space of healing &amp; peace to establish harmony &amp; rest on the University Of Samoa campus. 

The horticulture department with the help of Samoa Ministry of Natural Resources &amp; Environments kindly donated native plants, many if which contained medicinal properties. Aided by their creative landscape designs the students brought to life different sections of fruiting plants, Mediterranean pacific groves, medicinal plants alongside rainforest & floral areas.

The Textiles department injected colour into the garden through the making of prayer flags, individualizing them with fabric flowers in between the prayers. The prayers were all written by the students bringing colour words to the garden in order to bless the space.

The music and performing arts department brought sound & movement to the garden. With the music classes embodying the notion of peace &amp; harmony by using a blend of traditional & contemporary music, utilizing sound & tonal aspects of peace for self discovery having written a series of poems around what peace means to them. The performing arts students choreographing their own movement &amp; dance piece in accordance to their own relationships to the word peace activating the garden as a living theatre.

By using art as a catalyst for change in perception, the goal was to shift change in attitude, emotional state, pain &amp; wellbeing both personal &amp; environmental. By utilizing art as tool to aid coping with difficulties & helping transform outlook and engagement within the natural world around us. The major focus of the project was colour & ritual. By finding simple personal ceremonies to activate sacred space for self &amp; nature. By working through the colour spectrum with significance around the eastern philosophy of chakras & meditation, activating balance &amp; inner peace the students through the process to address the important issue of natural resource, recycling & environmental consciousness.
 
It is now known by neurophysiologists that art, prayer &amp; healing all come from the same source in the body, they all are associated with similar brain wave patterns. Art, prayer & healing all take us into our inner world, the world of imagery & emotion of vision & feeling. This journey inward is deeply healing, by working together for a common goal in a collaborative fashion the artist will help assist the students by providing support to create a new sense of understanding of the responsibility we have to the environment and to ourselves.

Offered by the university in partnership with Creative New Zealand the residency gives Pasifika artists, resident in New Zealand, an opportunity to develop their skills and practice.

 

 

 

PATAKA SHRINE WELLINGTON NZ

WELLINGTON INTERNATIONAL ARTS FESTIVAL  / PATAKA / beeswax, rice, pigment, flowers, incence, jars & organic healing medicines

The Pataka shrine sat alongside the Wellington iteration of Fly Me Up To Where You Are, protecting the flags and blessing the space. The concept of the shrine echoes the Eastern sentiment of making an offering to the dwelling places for invisible helpful spirits. Some say they are built for the spirits, such as guardian angels, that live in the land. Others believe the spirits own the land and must be given a better place to live than the house or building that will be built. Besides, individual shrines protecting homes, towns and cities can also have their own protective spirit houses In this case the artist has prepared a shrine for Pataka Art + Museum.  The shrine is there to  show respect for the spirits of the land. People must care for the spirits of the land, because the spirits are believed to protect people, grant their wishes, and bring them good luck and good health. In exchange, the spirits are given shelter, foods and gifts.  They are sacred spirits which take the form of things and concepts important to life, such as wind, rain, mountains, trees, rivers and fertility. Many people believe that each and every place has a local spirit or guardian, and the spirit possesses saksit,or a special power. 

Pataka Art + Museum, which has become the cultural heart of Porirua City, opened in 1998. In the 12 years since then the museum and gallery, which is about 15 minutes drive from central Wellington, has developed a reputation for showcasing the best in contemporary Maori and Pacific Arts, as well as contemporary New Zealand, Asian and international arts & culture. The building had been named Te Marae O Te Umu Kai O Hau and the new museum and gallery was officially opened in September 1998. Later that year it was given its current name, Pataka Museum of Arts and Cultures – Pataka in te reo means a storage place for precious things.

 

 

 

CONVERSATIONS AUCKLAND NZ

UNION  / M.I.C TOI REREHIKO / film piece

CONVERSATIONS
A collaborative work, made with the help of Shahriar Asdollah-zadeh, Maggie Buxton, Jon Bywater, James Charlton, Joe Hammond, Mark Henley, Tessa Laird, Kestin Stewart, Linda T, Raewyn Turner, Vaimaila Urale, Jim Vivieaere & Marcus Williams.
 
WHAT IS SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY?
Through art what we examine is much larger than any singular political agenda, with the implication that social responsibility is based on access to truth and its different ‘tellings’ of the whole truth. We are asked to actively engage in art work that has the possibility to encourage conversation, raise awareness, activate participation and stir the spirit. This movement towards an inclusive, process-based art making practice creates a space for outwardly & generously giving to each other, listening to each other & encouraging other perspectives. The more we see, hear & learn the more we can respect each other’s differences & embrace similarities. Could this shift mean we are entering a whole new paradigm for a socially relevant kind of art — one that celebrates & participates in the life-world around us?
 
This collaborative piece looks at how social projects can provide space for both idea & solution to help facilitate a structure for change. It also lends itself to notions of empowerment; through multiple narratives expressed as one voice. Multiple artists create one interaction, allowing for communication and recognition of the basic needs of our society.